| Home | Basic Information | Health | History | Behavior | Other Information
 

 

Beagle basic information

A Beagle is a medium-sized dog breed and a member of the hound group, similar in appearance to a Foxhound but smaller with shorter legs, and with longer, softer ears. Beagles are scent hounds used primarily for hunting rabbits to larger hares.

The Beagle has a somewhat oval skull; a medium-length, square-cut muzzle; large, hound-like hazel or brown eyes; long, low-set ears (big), turning towards the cheeks slightly and rounded at the tips; a medium-length, strong neck without folds in the skin; a broad chest narrowing to a tapered abdomen and waist; a short, slightly curved tail; an overall muscular body; and a medium-length, smooth, hard coat. One standard calls for ideally shaped beagles to be twice as long as tall, and twice as tall as wide.

They appear in a range of colors, not limited to the familiar tricolor (white with large black areas and light brown spots). Two-color varieties are always white with colored areas, including such colors as "lemon", a very light tan; "red", a reddish, almost orangish brown; and "liver", a darker brown (liver is the only colour not allowed in the British Standard). "Ticked" varieties may be either white or black with different colored spots ("ticking"), such as the bluetick beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolor beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.

Beagles are almost always born black and white, with the brownish areas developing later. The brown is usually the last color to appear, taking sometimes 1-2 years to fully develop. Some beagles gradually change color throughout their lives. Beagles typically have a white-tipped tail, or "flag", which is important in locating them in the field due to their short height.

Breed varieties
The American Kennel Club and the Canadian Kennel Club recognize two separate varieties of Beagle: the 13-inch for hounds less than 13 inches, and the 15-inch for those between 13 and 15 inches. The Kennel Club (UK) and FCI affiliated clubs recognize a single type, with a height of between 13 and 16 inches. These standard dogs can reach 35 lb or more.

In Medieval times, there was a breed called a pocket beagle, which stood at 8 to 9 inches. Small enough to fit in a "pocket" or saddlebag, they rode along on the hunt. The larger foxhounds would run the prey to ground, then the hunters would release the small beagles to continue the chase through underbrush into their burrows. Queen Elizabeth I often entertained guests at her royal table by letting her pocket beagles cavort amid their plates and cups. This genetic line is now extinct.

Complete List
Afghan Hound Airdale Terrier African Wild Dog Akita Inu American Akita
Alaskan Malamute American Cocker Spaniel American Eskimo Dog American Foxhound American Staffordshire Terrier
American Water Spaniel Anatolian Shepherd Appenzeller Sennenhunde Argentine Dogo Australian Cattle Dog
Australian Shepherd Australian Terrier Azawakh Basenji Basset Hound
Beagle Bearded Collie Beauceron Bedlington Terrier Belgian Sheperd Dog (Laekenois)
Belgian Sheperd Dog (Malinois) Belgian Sheepdog Belgian Sheperd Dog (Tervuren) Bergamasco Bernese Mountain Dog
Bichon Frise Black and Tan Coonhound Black Russian Terrier Bloodhound Bluetick Coonhound
Border Collie Border Terrier Borzoi Boston Terrier Bouvier des Flandres
Boxer Boykin Spaniel Bracco Italiano Briard Brussels Griffon
Bulldog Bullmastiff Bull Terrier Cairn Terrier Canaan Dog
Cane Corso Cardigan Welsh Corgi Catahoula Leopard Dog Caucasian Mountain Dog Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Cesky Terrier Chesapeake Bay Retriever Chihuahua Chinese Crested Dog Chinese Shar-Pei
Chinook Chow Chow Clumber Spaniel Collie Coton de Tulear
Curly Coated Retriever Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Dachshund Dalmatian Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Doberman Pinscher English Bulldog English Cocker Spaniel English Fox Hound English Setter
English Springer Spaniel English Toy Spaniel Field Spaniel Finnish Spitz Flat Coated Retriever
French Bulldog German Pinscher German Shepherd Dog German Shorthaired Pointer German Wirehaired Pointer
Giant Schnauzer Glen of Imaal Terrier Golden Retriever Gordon Setter Great Dane
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Great Pyrenees Greyhound Harrier Havanese
Ibizan Hound Irish Setter Irish Terrier Irish Water Spaniel Irish Wolfhound
Italian Greyhound Japanese Chin Kerry Blue Terrier Komondor Kuvasz
Labrador Retriever Lagotto Romagnolo Lakeland Terrier Lancashire Heeler Leonberger
Lhasa Apso L÷wchen Maltese Manchester Terrier Mastiff
Miniature Bull Terrier Miniature Pinscher Mudi Neapolitan Mastiff Newfoundland
Norfolk Terrier Norwegian Buhund Norwegian Elkhound Norwegian Lundehund Norwich Terrier
Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Old English Sheepdog Otterhound Papillon Parson Russell Terrier
Pekingese Pembroke Welsh Corgi Perro de Presa Canario Peruvian Inca Orchid Petit Basset Griffon VendÚen
Pharaoh Hound Plott Hound Pointer Polish Lowland Sheepdog Pomeranian
Poodle Portuguese Podengo Portuguese Water Dog Pudelpointer Pug
Puli Pumi Pyrenean Shepherd Rafeiro do Alentejo Rat Terrier
Redbone Coonhound Rhodesian Ridgeback Rottweiler Saint Bernard Saluki
Samoyed Schipperke Scottish Deerhound Scottish Terrier Sealyham Terrier
Shetland Sheepdog Shiba Inu Shih Tzu Siberian Husky Silky Terrier
Skye Terrier Sloughi Smooth Fox Terrier Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Spinone Italiano
Stabyhoun Staffordshire Bull Terrier Standard Schnauzer Sussex Spaniel Swedish Vallhund
Thai Ridgeback Tibetan Mastiff Tibetan Spaniel Tibetan Terrier Tosa
Toy Fox Terrier Treeing Tennessee Brindle Treeing Walker Coonhound Vizsla Weimaraner
Welsh Springer Spaniel Welsh Terrier West Highland White Terrier Whippet Wire Fox Terrier
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Xoloitzcuintli Yorkshire Terrier
Latest news about Yorkshire Terrier

copyright dogage.info

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Beagle".
eXTReMe Tracker