| Home | Basic Information | Health | History | Behavior | Other Information


Akita Inu behavior behavior

Although the American Kennel Club has put the Akita in the Working Group, the Akita was historically used as a hound to run large game, such as bears, in the mountainous areas of Japan. Anyone who has had hounds will recognise that group's very laid back, easygoing temperament in this breed.

Despite their enormous size, they are excellent house dogs. They require only a moderate amount of exercise. Akitas are known to be very quiet dogs, only barking "when there is something to bark about".

The two most outstanding characteristics of the Akita as a house pet are that they are very clean and that they are very easy to house break. Akitas have been described as almost "cat-like," they are so clean and odorless. This may also be one of the reasons why they housebreak so easily. Most Akitas respond so well to housebreaking that they are trained in a matter of weeks.

As far as the family children are concerned, there are few worries. Akitas are devoted, patient friends and protectors of children. Akitas are typically very gentle with children, and it is said that Japanese mothers often left their children with only the Akitas to watch over and protect them. Remember, however, that young children should never be left unattended with a pet. When raised indoors with children, they can be excellent companions.

Left unattended in the backyard or in a kennel, they tend to develop "personality" problems and become very destructive to the yard, which is due to boredom. They are highly pack oriented, thus, isolating them from the pack (i.e., the owner) causes them great stress.

Akitas tend to be stubborn and require a firm but loving education where "no" always means "no" and never "whatever".

While not aggressive to humans, Akitas have been known to attack, and sometimes kill, other dogs. Two males can easily get violent with each other if given the chance, which is why most breeders keep their studs separate. The same is true for females, although they tend to be more tolerant towards other females. The Akita is a dominant dog who expects other dogs to be submissive. If they fail to live up to the Akita's expectations, incidents can happen. The Akita is not a dangerous dog but their sociability with other dogs should be handled with caution.

Akitas have a high and well-developed prey drive, particularly to small animals, including cats. An Akita is not likely to shower affection on someone that is not a member of his family or a close friend that he sees frequently, and can be extremely aloof.

The loyalty and devotion displayed by an Akita is phenomenal. The typical pet Akita will follow you from room to room, yet has the uncanny ability not to be underfoot. Your Akita lives his life as if his only purpose is to protect you and spend time with you. This trait is evident in the tale of Hachiko.

Complete List
Afghan Hound Airdale Terrier African Wild Dog Akita Inu American Akita
Alaskan Malamute American Cocker Spaniel American Eskimo Dog American Foxhound American Staffordshire Terrier
American Water Spaniel Anatolian Shepherd Appenzeller Sennenhunde Argentine Dogo Australian Cattle Dog
Australian Shepherd Australian Terrier Azawakh Basenji Basset Hound
Beagle Bearded Collie Beauceron Bedlington Terrier Belgian Sheperd Dog (Laekenois)
Belgian Sheperd Dog (Malinois) Belgian Sheepdog Belgian Sheperd Dog (Tervuren) Bergamasco Bernese Mountain Dog
Bichon Frise Black and Tan Coonhound Black Russian Terrier Bloodhound Bluetick Coonhound
Border Collie Border Terrier Borzoi Boston Terrier Bouvier des Flandres
Boxer Boykin Spaniel Bracco Italiano Briard Brussels Griffon
Bulldog Bullmastiff Bull Terrier Cairn Terrier Canaan Dog
Cane Corso Cardigan Welsh Corgi Catahoula Leopard Dog Caucasian Mountain Dog Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Cesky Terrier Chesapeake Bay Retriever Chihuahua Chinese Crested Dog Chinese Shar-Pei
Chinook Chow Chow Clumber Spaniel Collie Coton de Tulear
Curly Coated Retriever Czechoslovakian Wolfdog Dachshund Dalmatian Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Doberman Pinscher English Bulldog English Cocker Spaniel English Fox Hound English Setter
English Springer Spaniel English Toy Spaniel Field Spaniel Finnish Spitz Flat Coated Retriever
French Bulldog German Pinscher German Shepherd Dog German Shorthaired Pointer German Wirehaired Pointer
Giant Schnauzer Glen of Imaal Terrier Golden Retriever Gordon Setter Great Dane
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Great Pyrenees Greyhound Harrier Havanese
Ibizan Hound Irish Setter Irish Terrier Irish Water Spaniel Irish Wolfhound
Italian Greyhound Japanese Chin Kerry Blue Terrier Komondor Kuvasz
Labrador Retriever Lagotto Romagnolo Lakeland Terrier Lancashire Heeler Leonberger
Lhasa Apso L÷wchen Maltese Manchester Terrier Mastiff
Miniature Bull Terrier Miniature Pinscher Mudi Neapolitan Mastiff Newfoundland
Norfolk Terrier Norwegian Buhund Norwegian Elkhound Norwegian Lundehund Norwich Terrier
Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Old English Sheepdog Otterhound Papillon Parson Russell Terrier
Pekingese Pembroke Welsh Corgi Perro de Presa Canario Peruvian Inca Orchid Petit Basset Griffon VendÚen
Pharaoh Hound Plott Hound Pointer Polish Lowland Sheepdog Pomeranian
Poodle Portuguese Podengo Portuguese Water Dog Pudelpointer Pug
Puli Pumi Pyrenean Shepherd Rafeiro do Alentejo Rat Terrier
Redbone Coonhound Rhodesian Ridgeback Rottweiler Saint Bernard Saluki
Samoyed Schipperke Scottish Deerhound Scottish Terrier Sealyham Terrier
Shetland Sheepdog Shiba Inu Shih Tzu Siberian Husky Silky Terrier
Skye Terrier Sloughi Smooth Fox Terrier Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Spinone Italiano
Stabyhoun Staffordshire Bull Terrier Standard Schnauzer Sussex Spaniel Swedish Vallhund
Thai Ridgeback Tibetan Mastiff Tibetan Spaniel Tibetan Terrier Tosa
Toy Fox Terrier Treeing Tennessee Brindle Treeing Walker Coonhound Vizsla Weimaraner
Welsh Springer Spaniel Welsh Terrier West Highland White Terrier Whippet Wire Fox Terrier
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Xoloitzcuintli Yorkshire Terrier
Latest news about Yorkshire Terrier

copyright dogage.info

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Akita_Inu".
eXTReMe Tracker